Авторизация
 
 
Регистрация на сайте
Восстановление пароля


Новостные каналы


Skip Navigation LinksTopTJ.com  →  Новости Таджикистана  → 

Лента новостей

19.06.201408:21
Источник изображения: ИА "Авеста"

Выпуск-49

id: 99013

date: 3/5/2007 8:34

refid: 07ANKARA488

origin: Embassy Ankara

classification: CONFIDENTIAL

destination: 07ANKARA383

header:

VZCZCXRO5010

PP RUEHDBU RUEHFL RUEHKW RUEHLA RUEHROV RUEHSR

DE RUEHAK #0488/01 0640834

ZNY CCCCC ZZH

P 050834Z MAR 07

FM AMEMBASSY ANKARA

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 1200

INFO RUEHZL/EUROPEAN POLITICAL COLLECTIVE PRIORITY

RUEHAH/AMEMBASSY ASHGABAT PRIORITY 1926

RUEHKB/AMEMBASSY BAKU PRIORITY 1470

RUEHEK/AMEMBASSY BISHKEK PRIORITY 0355

RUEHDB/AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE PRIORITY

RUEHBUL/AMEMBASSY KABUL PRIORITY 0036

RUEHNT/AMEMBASSY TASHKENT PRIORITY 0755

RHMFISS/HQ USEUCOM VAIHINGEN GE PRIORITY

RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC PRIORITY

RHMFISS/HQ USCENTCOM MACDILL AFB FL PRIORITY

RHEFDIA/DIA WASHDC PRIORITY

RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHDC//J-3/J-5// PRIORITY

RHEHAAA/NSC WASHDC PRIORITY

RUEUITH/ODC ANKARA TU//TCH// PRIORITY

RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC PRIORITY

RUEUITH/TLO ANKARA TU PRIORITY

RUEHAK/TSR ANKARA TU PRIORITY

RUEHAK/USDAO ANKARA TU PRIORITY

----------------- header ends ----------------

C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 03 ANKARA 000488

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: DECL: 02/27/2022

TAGS: PREL, PGOV, TX, AJ, UZ, TI, AF, KG, TU

SUBJECT: MFA CENTRAL ASIA CONSULTATIONS IN ANKARA

REF: ANKARA 383

Classified by Deputy Polcouns Kelly Degnan for Reasons 1.4

(b,d)

1. (C) Summary:  Turkey's approach to Central Asian countries

largely echoes ours:  ensuring security and stability,

promoting democracy and human rights and fostering economic

development and integration.  During broad consultations in

Ankara, SCA DAS Evan Feigenbaum and MFA interlocutors

explored opportunities for joint or complementary cooperation

in the areas of education, developmental assistance, regional

economic development and integration, and diversification of

energy supplies and routes.  All agreed that Turkmenistan and

Uzbekistan offered the greatest challenges for effective

engagement.  Both sides agreed that operationalizing these

ideas for cooperation is the next step.  End Summary.

2. (SBU) SCA DAS Feigenbaum and Senior Advisor Robert Deutsch

conducted a full day of consultations with Turkish government

officials on tral Asia.  They also met with representatives from

the Turkish General Staff, the Turkish International

Cooperation Agency (TICA), the Foreign Trade Undersecretariat

and the Ministry of Transportation (septel).  They spoke with

businessmen, academics and intellectuals involved in Central

Asia.  Following a breakfast roundtable with journalists, the

media covered the visit in a straightforward manner.

-------------------

Regional Challenges

-------------------

3. (C) MFA Deputy U/S Cevikoz characterized Turkey's approach

to Central Asia as the "Four Ds" -- Democratization,

Development, Diversification and Dialogue.  Turkey's emphasis

on human rights and democracy has increased in recent years

and its trade and investment in the region continues to rise.

 The GOT is pushing diversification beyond energy through

expanding transport links.  Cevikoz cautioned that

calibrating dialogue with the region's leaders is vital; most

reject criticism and are paranoid of outsiders.  U/S Apakan

emphasized the GOT's aim to integrate Central Asian countries

into the international community and into its grouping of

Turkic nations.  Apakan asserted these countries are allergic

to multilateral cooperation and prefer bilateral approaches.

Cevikoz reported that the 9th "Turkic Summit" will be held in

Azerbaijan this year.

4. (C)  DG Uman said Turkey considers Central Asia a

strategic region with huge natural resources.  Like the U.S.,

the GOT supports independent, sovereign states moving in a

democratic direction, security, stability and regional

integration and cooperation.  He characterized the region's

greatest challenges as slow democratization, a lack of human

rights, a difficult business and investment climate, poor

rule of law and meager education and health sectors. Uman

described the primary factors affecting regional stability as

ethnicity, porous borders and an uneven distribution of

wealth.

5. (C) DAS Feigenbaum outlined the USG's multi-dimensional

approach, involving security, economic development and trade,

democratic reform and human rights, regional economic

integration, education, energy and transnational issues such

as counter-narcotics.  These issues are cross-cutting: better

border control leads to increased commerce, as well as

enhanced security; rule of law improves the investment

climate and improves trade even as it builds democratic

habits and institutions.  He emphasized the policy as a focus

ANKARA 00000488  002 OF 003

on the countries themselves and not as part of a "great game"

with Russia and China.  The aim of economic integration is

not just to connect Central Asia to the south, but in every

direction on the compass.

-------------------------------

Potential Areas for Cooperation

-------------------------------

6. (SBU) U/S Apakan and MFA agreed to explore opportunities

for joint and/or complementary cooperation in several areas,

including:

-- Education:  The GOT has granted 18,000 university

scholarships to Central Asian students since 1991 and agrees

that this area is ripe for increased engagement, particularly

in Turkmenistan.  U/S Apakan suggested specific cooperation

ideas, such as working with the GOT on its program to assist

Azerbaijan's diplomatic training school and perhaps expanding

it to Central Asian countries and sectors such and

politicians and engineers, and exploring ways to use the

joint university programs between Turkey and the U.S. (such

as the SUNY program) as a vehicle to include Central Asian

students.  They also identified such areas as curriculum

development, expanding Turkish and American schools in the

region and increasing student exchanges.  DAS Feigenbaum

suggested that SCA's regional education coordinator could

follow up with additional ideas.

-- Other developmental assistance:  U/S Apakan and DG Uman

suggested that programs in the areas of health, agriculture

and vocational training could also be explored, particularly

between the Turkish International Cooperation Agency (TICA)

and USAID.  DAS Feigenbaum urged MFA to encourage TICA to

engage withmproving the investment

climate and rule of law is important, and suggested exploring

joint U.S-Turkey business ventures.  Senior Advisor Deutsch

briefed on regional economic integration efforts, including

the potential for regional hydropower cooperation.  DG Uman

suggested that the Turkish-American Business Council explore

ways to collaborate with chambers in Central Asian countries,

perhaps in the context of public-private partnerships.  They

also discussed increasing Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

(SMEs) loans and assistance, an area in which both TICA and

USAID are active.

-- Energy:  Referring to the recent delegation led by EB A/S

Sullivan to discuss regional energy issues, both sides agreed

that oil and gas cooperation is vital.

-- Transnational Issues:  U/S Apakan suggested that

counter-narcotics training could be an area for joint

cooperation.

------------

Turkmenistan

------------

7. (C)  Deputy U/S Cevikoz called the post-Niyazov era a new

beginning but cautioned that a prudent and careful approach

is necessary and change will be slow.  DAS Feigenbaum said we

are proactive, but do not expect systemic change to come

overnight.  He summarized recent U.S. diplomacy.  DG Uman

believed the performance of the new Turkmen leaders should be

watched, not just the promises.  The presidential election

process was questionable, although some Berdimuhammadov

statements were promising, e.g., on education.  Turkey has

strong business interests there and some ongoing cooperation

ANKARA 00000488  003 OF 003

with U.S. businesses.  Turkmenistan's educational sector is

in especially bad shape, Uman noted, particularly since the

government did not honor foreign diplomas nor allow students

to go abroad for education.

----------

Uzbekistan

----------

8. (C) Uzbekistan has been a big disappointment for Turkey,

Uman said.  With half the population of Central Asia, an

intelligentsia and constitutional structure and economic

opportunities, it should have been one of the most successful

states in the region. Uman, who served there as Ambassador

from 2000 to 2004, stated that no democratic channels exist.

Turkey's political relations with the GOU are almost frozen,

he added.  DAS Feigenbaum reviewed the steps the U.S. has

taken over the last 20 months, and then noted the agenda for

his upcoming visit.  Discussing the EU's strategy on engaging

Uzbekistan post-Andijan, Uman agreed with our message to the

EU not to confuse dialogue with substantive movement and said

Turkey has given the same advice.  Admiring a USAID-program

in Uzbekistan that fostered community participation while he

was there, Uman criticized TICA for not doing similar

programs.

-------upport of an eventual

OSCE chairmanship but noted our concern that Kazakhstan is

not yet ready in terms of standards; the United States, he

said, was prepared to work with Kazakhstan to this end.  Uman

cautioned that Kazakhstan continues to look to Russia for

consent on oil and gas concessions.  Senior Advisor Deutsch

briefed on the hydropower potential of Kyrgyzstan and

Tajikistan to export electricity to South Asia.  DG Uman said

Turkey should share its experience with the GAP project in

southeast Turkey.

10. (U)  SCA DAS Feigenbaum has cleared this message.

Visit Ankara's Classified Web Site at

http://www.state.sgov.gov/p/eur/ankara/

WILSON

=======================CABLE ENDS============================

id: 99014

date: 3/5/2007 8:35

refid: 07ANKARA489

origin: Embassy Ankara

classification: CONFIDENTIAL

destination:

header:

VZCZCXRO6845

PP RUEHDBU RUEHFL RUEHKW RUEHLA RUEHROV RUEHSR

DE RUEHAK #0489/01 0640835

ZNY CCCCC ZZH

P 050835Z MAR 07

FM AMEMBASSY ANKARA

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 1203

INFO RUEHZL/EUROPEAN POLITICAL COLLECTIVE PRIORITY

RUEHAH/AMEMBASSY ASHGABAT PRIORITY 1929

RUEHKB/AMEMBASSY BAKU PRIORITY 1473

RUEHEK/AMEMBASSY BISHKEK PRIORITY 0358

RUEHDB/AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE PRIORITY

RUEHBUL/AMEMBASSY KABUL PRIORITY 0039

RUEHNT/AMEMBASSY TASHKENT PRIORITY 0758

RHMFISS/HQ USEUCOM VAIHINGEN GE PRIORITY

RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC PRIORITY

RHMFISS/HQ USCENTCOM MACDILL AFB FL PRIORITY

RHEFDIA/DIA WASHDC PRIORITY

RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHDC//J-3/J-5// PRIORITY

RHEHAAA/NSC WASHDC PRIORITY

RUEUITH/ODC ANKARA TU//TCH// PRIORITY

RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC PRIORITY

RUEUITH/TLO ANKARA TU PRIORITY

RUEHAK/TSR ANKARA TU PRIORITY

RUEHAK/USDAO ANKARA TU PRIORITY

----------------- header ends ----------------

C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 ANKARA 000489

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: DECL: 02/27/2022

TAGS: PREL, PGOV, TX, AJ, UZ, TI, AF, KG, TU

SUBJECT: TURKEY EAGER TO COOPERATE ON CENTRAL ASIA

ANKARA 00000489  001.2 OF 002

Classified by Deputy Polcouns Kelly Degnan for Reasons 1.4

(b,d)

1. (C) Summary:  Turkish government officials agreed with SCA

DAS Evan Feigenbaum to explore complementary cooperation

where possible on our approaches to Central Asia (septel).

Representatives from the Turkish General Staff, the Turkish

International Cooperation Administration, the Foreign Trade

Secretariat and the Ministry of Transportation elaborated on

SIPDIS

Turkish involvement in Central Asia in meetings February 26

and offered ideas for future collaboration.  End Summary.

--------------------

Military Cooperation

--------------------

2. (C) Turkish General Staff J5 LTG Hilmi Zorlu enumerated

Turkish military support to the Central Asian nations, to

include the training to date of nearly 900 Central Asian

military personnel in Turkish service academies, civilian

universities and the Partnership for Peace training center.

The Turkish military is focusing its training efforts on

changing the mentality of younger officers and soldiers.

Turkey advocates a slow, steady approach to Central Asia to

avoid exacerbating Russian concerns.

3. (C) Feigenbaum briefed Zorlu on U.S. efforts to develop

more robust security relationships with Central Asia, through

NATO,s Partnership for Peace, the establishment of military

bases such as Manas in Kyrgyzstan, and provision of training

and equipment.  The U.S. and Turkey would benefit from

coordinated its approaches and messages to Central Asian

nations.  As a fellow NATO member with troops in Afghanistan,

Feigenbaum asked for Zorlu,s support in convincing

Kyrgyzstan of the importance of our continued use of Manas

airbase to our efforts in Afghanistan.  Zorlu stressed the

importance of combining military assistance with economic aid

for civilian populations.  He and Feigenbaum agreed that we

can both work with Kazakhstan, while Uzbekistan will be more

difficult.  We are just beginning to establish a dialogue

with Turkmenistan, taking advantage of openings following

Niyazov,s death in December, Zorlu said.

4. (C) Feigenbaum explained the U.S. strategy of promoting

energy competition and free markets in Central Asia.  We do

not demand Central Asians scrap existing contracts with

Russia, but rather encourage them to consider alternatives

for new production.  Zorlu highlighted persistent Russian

attempts to "break up" development of east-west energy

corridors by promoting north-south alternatives through

Armenia and Iran, or by trying to financially dominate these

corridors in the case of the Burgas route through Bulgaria

and Greece.   Feigenbaum suggested that Turkey continue to

encourage good relations between Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan

on energy and other issues.

---------------------------------------

Development Collaboration Possibilities

---------------------------------------

5. (C) In his meeting with Turkish International Cooperation

Administration (USAID equivalent) Acting President Mustafa

Sahin, Feigenbaum called for dialogue and cooperation with

Turkey on providing assistance to Central Asia.  Sahin

described TICA as employing a "demand-driven" approach and

noted that they had field offices in all five of the Central

Asian countries.  Moreover, over half of all TICA,s

assistance goes to the Central Asia and Caucasus countries.

Feigenbaum proposed that there be contact between TICA and

USAID at the field office level and that the TICA President

visit USAID in Washington, in part to discuss USAID's

democracy capacity building assistance.  Sahin offered that

while TICA did not provide democracy building assistance, all

of the TICA assistance contributed indirectly to this goal.

ANKARA 00000489  002 OF 002

He opined that although Uzbekistan was a difficult partner,

TICA maintains programs there related to activities

supporting vocational training, pistachio nuts, seeds, and

greenhouses.

---------------------------

Foreign Trade Opportunities

---------------------------

6. (C) DAS Feigenbaum's meeting with Hasan Yalcin, Deputy

Director General for Agreements at the Foreign Trade

Undersecretariat (FTU), focused on U.S. efforts to improve

the investment climate in the five Central Asian Republics.

Feigenbaum cited the significant U.S. investment in these

countries and encouraged Turkish it point for Caspian oil and gas and

would be open to future collaborative efforts.  He suggested

that this topic could be included in the upcoming U.S.-Turkey

Trade and Investment Framework Agreement Council meeting,

tentatively scheduled for late March or early April.

----------------------

Transportation Options

----------------------

7. (C) In a meeting with Suat Hayri Aka, Deputy

Undersecretary of Transport and Communications, Deutsch

described current efforts to improve roadways and air travel

in this region to compensate for the lack of railways.  He

focused on efforts to improve the customs services in these

countries and to expand and improve civil aviation.  U/S Aka

agreed that these countries could learn from Turkish

Airlines' experience in the region and that perhaps Turkish

construction companies could play a role in these projects.

He expressed Turkey's interest in future collaboration.

8. (U)  SCA DAS Feigenbaum cleared this message.

Visit Ankara's Classified Web Site at

http://www.state.sgov.gov/p/eur/ankara/

WILSON

=======================CABLE ENDS============================

id: 99083

date: 3/5/2007 13:23

refid: 07ASHGABAT259

origin: Embassy Ashgabat

classification: CONFIDENTIAL

destination: 07ASHGABAT199

header:

VZCZCXRO5397

OO RUEHDBU

DE RUEHAH #0259/01 0641323

ZNY CCCCC ZZH

O 051323Z MAR 07

FM AMEMBASSY ASHGABAT

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 8490

INFO RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE PRIORITY

RUEHLM/AMEMBASSY COLOMBO PRIORITY 0212

RUEHKA/AMEMBASSY DHAKA PRIORITY 0234

RUEHIL/AMEMBASSY ISLAMABAD PRIORITY 1905

RUEHBUL/AMEMBASSY KABUL PRIORITY 0648

RUEHNE/AMEMBASSY NEW DELHI PRIORITY 0702

RHMFISS/CDR USCENTCOM MACDILL AFB FL//CCJ2/HSE/CCJ5// PRIORITY

RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC PRIORITY

RHEFDIA/DIA WASHINGTON DC//DHO-2/REA/NMJIC-J2// PRIORITY

RHEBAAA/DEPT OF ENERGY WASHDC PRIORITY

RUCPDOC/DEPT OF COMMERCE WASHDC PRIORITY

RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC PRIORITY

RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHDC PRIORITY

RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY

----------------- header ends ----------------

C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 03 ASHGABAT 000259

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

STATE FOR SCA, NSC FOR DEHART

E.O. 12958: DECL: 03/06/2007

TAGS: PREL, EPET, ENRG, PGOV, AF, KZ, TX, US, UZ, TI, IR

SUBJECT: PRESIDENT BERDIMUHAMMEDOV RECEPTIVE TO PIPELINE

DIVERSIFICATION

REF: ASHGABAT 199

Classified By: Charge d'Affaires, a.i. Jennifer L. Brush for reasons 1.

4 (B) and (D).

SUMMARY

-------

1.  (C) President of Turkmenistan Gurbanguly Berdimuhammedov

showed sincere interest in Principal Deputy Assistant

Secretary Steven Mann's detailed March 5 presentation of

SIPDIS

alternative paths to developing the country's energy sector.

In the context of stressing his concern for development that

benefits his country and the need to review PDAS Mann's

points with his own advisors, Berdimuhammedov was generally

open to suggestions that Turkmenistan seek expertise from

U.S. and Western energy sector companies and should attract

foreign investment.  Berdimuhammedov was also favorable to

the idea of talking to Azerbaijan in order to resolve the

issue of Caspian Sea delineation.  Although the meeting

focused on energy issues, PDAS Mann presented U.S. support

for Turkmenistan in this field within the broader context of

seeing genuine political, economic, and social reform.  END

SUMMARY

OPEN EARS TO ENERGY SECTOR DEVELOPMENT; EXPORT DIVERSIFICATION

--------------------------------------

2.  (C) President Berdimuhammedov opened his March 5 meeting

with Mann by welcoming the latter's detailed analysis of

Turkmenistan's energy resources and their prospects for

development, extraction and export.  During the meeting,

Berdimuhammedov and his Deputy Chairman for Foreign Affairs

Rashit Meredov listened with interest and accepted several

handouts detailing estimates of future prospects for

Turkmenistan,s gas and oil exports, given various investment

scenarios.  Mann stressed that the overarching U.S. interest

in Turkmenistan's energy sector development was to see that

the country maintained its independence and sovereignty

through multiple outlets of its energy exports.

3.  (C) In his overview, Mann first presented the vast

potential of Turkmenistan's gas and oil reserves, as

developed by USDOC expert Paul Hueper.  Mann briefed on the

recent IEA gas conference in Paris and the excellent

prospects for European demand and then provided a frank

discussion of the context in which Russia,s Gazprom held a

virtual monopoly over gas exports from Turkmenistan, limiting

the country's options and profits.  He also pointed to the

Primorsk pipeline and Sakhalin-2 as examples of the

unconstrained monopoly power of Transneft and Gazprom.  As a

result of this context, pipeline diversification brought

major benefits in order to have more than one way to reach

world markets and reduce Turkmenistan,s dependence on

Russian monopolies.  Mann also noted that future extractions

of natural gas in Turkmenistan would require world-class

technology.  In comparing high, medium and current levels of

investment, Mann noted that current levels would ultimately

result in a fall in overall production due to these concerns.

 A favorable investment climate therefore was necessary in

order to attract a world-class level of development.  He also

described the role of American and Western energy companies

in other parts of the region as reliable partners who

invested in infrastructure and education in the course of

their partnership, noting that these benefits would coincide

with many of Berdimuhammedov's recently initiated reforms in

education.

4.  (C) PDAS Mann also raised the issue of Caspian Sea

delimitation as an unresolved issue which still hindered

development of the energy sector.  He offered U.S. support

for efforts to find agreement with Azerbaijan on this issue.

He suggested that an agreement would open the way for the

"Serdar" field to produce no less than 500,000 barrels per

day of potential exports.

ASHGABAT 00000259  002 OF 003

5.  (C) Mann stressed that in order to be successful,

Turkmenistan would have to rid itself of a Soviet, state

mentality with regard to its economy and energy sector.  The

TCP project of 1997-2000 failed because of this mentality.

He stressed at various points that the true test of

reliability as a trading partner was not government

pronouncements but whether or not private companies would

actually take the risk to invest and construct pipelines or

extract resources.

POSITIVE BUT CAUTIOUS RESPONSE

------------------------------

6.  (C) Berdimuhammedov appeared to be impressed by the

presentation but said that Turkmenistan's data differed from

that Mann presented. He believed the level of reserves was

considerably higher.  He stressed his need to review the

subject and Mann,s provided figures with his own advisors

and government.  However, he expressed an openness to

discussing the issue in the future with U.S. experts and a

general willingness to cooperate in the future.

7.  (C) The president also placed emphasis on the fact that

his government was still new and there was still a need to

review policy before taking major decisions.  He noted his

interest in foreign investment and the additional benefits

that could come from education and exchange with U.S.

companies or experts.  All the while, he stressed his role as

president to make decisions for the benefit of his people.

He stated in an even tone that Turkmenistan would continue

the policy line on energy established by Turkmenbashi,

including existing contracts with Russia.  Mann stressed that

it was not the U.S. desire to disturb any existing

arrangements but to focus on the future; the U.S. respects

Turkmenistan's continuing relationships with Russia and

China.

FIRST STEP ON RESOLVING THE CASPIAN DELIMITATION?

-----------------------------------

8.  (C) Berdimuhammedov clearly welcomed Mann's suggestion of

U.S. support in trying to resolve the disputed delineation of

its Caspian Sea border with Azerbaijan and was open to the

prospect of experts' talks to further advance the

possibilities for tapping into the region,s energy reserves.

 He looked forward to discussing the issue personally with

President Aliyev and said he had a positive view of Aliyev.

9.  (C) However, Berdimuhammedov was careful to flag that

commercial disputes might arise in future energy development

and that Turkmenistan would have to defend its interests

vigorously.  Mann accepted that and advised that Turkmenistan

had not been getting the full benefit of its energy

resources, thanks to the lack of a pricing formula for

natural gas sales.  Mann attempted to ease the president's

concerns by noting that the U.S. interest in pipeline

diversification was in preserving the independence and

sovereignty of the region,s countries, first and foremost by

decreasing their reliance on the Russian Gazprom monopoly.

What Turkmenistan needs above all for hydrocarbon development

is to attract the serious interest of major firms.  The small

concerns that operate in Turkmenistan now -- as well as the

Russians and Chinese -- are not up to the major tasks and

Turkmenistan must take steps to attract world-class energy

firms.

BROADER CONTEXT OF BILATERAL RELATIONSHIP: REFORM NEEDED

-----------------------------------------

10.  (C) Towards the end of the meeting, Mann also noted the

increased Washington interest in Turkmenistan, due partly to

Berdimuhammedov's statements and initial steps towards

reform.  Mann noted that cooperation between the two

countries depended also on improvement in the political

ASHGABAT 00000259  003 OF 003

relationship.  This has consequences for energy as well as

for other issues.  Foreign firms consider Turkmenistan a bad

risk, given Bridas' and Sheraton's experience, and until rule

of law and a stable investment climate are more firmly

established, it will be a hard sell to bring those firms in.

COMMENT

-------

11.  (C) Berdimuhammedov,s brief comments on preserving the

status quo appeared to reflect  necessary lip service as well

as a wariness that the U.S. would be urging conflict with

Russia.  That topic disposed of, the President followed the

discussion in detail and with real interest and gave an

unequivocal green light to develop the

government-to-government relationship on energy.  The

discussion of Caspian delimitation was notably positive both

for the lack of Niyazovist bluster as well as for the quietly

reasonable willingness to engage with Azerbaijan.  His

tentative but positive response to foreign investment and

export diversification in the energy sector probably reflects

his lack of expertise in the field and his still-forming

energy policy.  It's clear that he has little familiarity

with the way the private sector works at a serious level.

Still, his comments throughout the meeting seemed to reflect

a sincere interest in examining and addressing the range of

issues we raised.  The president,s willingness to talk

further on the topic, his welcoming words on foreign

investment and a stated readiness to work with Azerbaijan all

represent positive signs for future energy development in

Turkmenistan.END COMMENT

BRUSH

=======================CABLE ENDS============================

id: 99398

date: 3/7/2007 11:56

refid: 07DUSHANBE335

origin: Embassy Dushanbe

classification: UNCLASSIFIED

destination:

header:

VZCZCXRO8239

RR RUEHLN RUEHVK RUEHYG

DE RUEHDBU #0335 0661156

ZNR UUUUU ZZH

R 071156Z MAR 07

FM AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 9753

INFO RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 1402

RUCPDOC/USDOC WASHDC 0144

RUEHAK/AMEMBASSY ANKARA 1957

RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 1939

RUEHRL/AMEMBASSY BERLIN 1867

RUEHBS/USEU BRUSSELS 1184

RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC

RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE

RHEFDIA/DIA WASHINGTON DC

RUEHDBU/AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE 1373

RUEHIL/AMEMBASSY ISLAMABAD 2039

RUEHBUL/AMEMBASSY KABUL 2000

RUEHML/AMEMBASSY MANILA 0147

RUEHNE/AMEMBASSY NEW DELHI 2015

RHEHAAA/NSC WASHINGTON DC

RUEHFR/AMEMBASSY PARIS 1603

RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC

RUEHKO/AMEMBASSY TOKYO 1622

RUEHVEN/USMISSION USOSCE 1920

----------------- header ends ----------------

UNCLAS DUSHANBE 000335

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

STATE FOR SCA/CEN

E.O. 12958: N/A

TAGS: EINV, ECON, EFIN, EIND, EAID, ETRD, PGOV, TI

SUBJECT: AGAINST THE GRAIN - IMPROVING THE INVESTMENT CLIMATE IN

TAJIKISTAN

1.  (U) SUMMARY.  The newly-formed State Committee on

Investments and State Property will seek to attract foreign

direct investment to Tajikistan.  However, the committee has few

tools and resources to fully realize its well intentioned

programs.  U.S. technical assistance will support the committee

in its uphill battle to improve the investment climate.  END

SUMMARY.

2.  (SBU) In an introductory meeting with the Ambassador

February 28, Committee Chair Sharif Rahimov explained that the

new committee hoped to help foreign investors by creating an

English-language website and by establishing a "one-stop-shop"

for registration and licensing in Tajikistan.  Rahimov and his

staff understand that the information vacuum prevents foreign

companies from investigating investment opportunities in

Tajikistan.  Rahimov would also like to create a fund to provide

micro-credit to small and medium businesses.  "Medium-sized

businesses most want a stable economy, so we need to work with

them more than with small or big businesses," Rahimov remarked,

asserting that both small and big businesses evade the law

rather than work with it.

3.  (U) The committee faces severe financial problems in

implementing its program.  The committee has no email or

computer network for document sharing; they lack funds for

translating documents into English; and cannot afford to pay for

web design.  Rahimov requested U.S. technical assistance to

train the committee's staff, to help create the website, to

review legislation, identify and eliminate barriers for the

private sector, and develop registration procedures and

investment packages for foreign investors.

4.  (U) USAID's new Business Environment Improvement Project

implemented by Pragma will provide the committee technical

assistance in drafting laws, conducting analysis, and liaising

with the private sector.  Increasing the capacity of this

committee would positively improve the investment climate in

Tajikistan; however, lack of funding prevents us from providing

the necessary assistance.

5.  (SBU) COMMENT: The creation of the new State Committee on

Investments, like the new Anti-Corruption Agency, should be seen

as a positive indicator that President Rahmonov and his

government recognize the importance of these issues.  However,

in order to have an impact beyond window dressing, the new

institutions will need both further Government of Tajikistan

resources, as well as foreign assistance.  Challenging the

status quo and those who benefit from it is a long-term process

requiring substantial political will.

JACOBSON

=======================CABLE ENDS============================

id: 99701

date: 3/9/2007 4:59

refid: 07DUSHANBE337

origin: Embassy Dushanbe

classification: SECRET

destination:

header:

VZCZCXRO0474

RR RUEHTRO

DE RUEHDBU #0337 0680459

ZNY SSSSS ZZH

R 090459Z MAR 07

FM AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 9756

INFO RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE

RUEHIL/AMEMBASSY ISLAMABAD 2040

RUEHNE/AMEMBASSY NEW DELHI 2016

RUEHBUL/AMEMBASSY KABUL 2001

RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC

RHEFDIA/DIA WASHINGTON DC

RHEHAAA/NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL WASHINGTON DC

RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 1403

RUEHII/VIENNA IAEA POSTS COLLECTIVE

RUEHDBU/AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE 1376

----------------- header ends ----------------

S E C R E T DUSHANBE 000337

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

ISN, EB, NEA, IO, VCI, P, T, TFI

E.O. 12958: DECL:  3/7/2017

TAGS: KNNP, UNSC, AORC, ETRD, TRGY, IR, TI

SUBJECT: TAJIK RESPONSE TO DEMARCHE ON IRANIAN NON-COMPLIANCE WITH

UNSCR 1737

REF: STATE 23001, STATE 24344

CLASSIFIED BY: David Froman, Economic Officer, Pol/Econ, DOS.

REASON: 1.4 (b)

1.  (C)  PolOff delivered ref demarches regarding the Iranian

government's non-compliance with United Nations Security Council

Resolution (UNSCR) 1737 to Ismatullo Nasredinov, Chief of the

American Countries Branch, Tajik Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Nasredinov replied that the Tajik government opposed Iran's

nuclear program, even for peaceful purposes.  They believe that

Iran's abundant oil and gas supplies are sufficient to supply

Iran's energy needs.  However, the Tajik government is not

willing to approach the Iranian government on this issue, due to

the solid economic relationship that currently exists between

the two countries.  Nasredinov added that Iran and Tajikistan

have good relations in the spheres of culture, science and

energy, and any perceived pressure by the Tajik government could

threaten the positive nature of their bilateral cooperation.

2.  (C)  Nasredinov noted that Tajikistan was a small country

with many economic problems, and that they needed to attract

investment and economic aid from as many different countries as

possible.  He remarked that if larger countries such as the

United States, Russia and China were not able to influence the

Iranian government, he doubted that a small country such as

Tajikistan would hold any weight.

JACOBSON

=======================CABLE ENDS============================

id: 99774

date: 3/9/2007 11:28

refid: 07DUSHANBE348

origin: Embassy Dushanbe

classification: UNCLASSIFIED

destination: 07DUSHANBE348|07STATE22077

header:

VZCZCXRO0911

RR RUEHLN RUEHVK RUEHYG

DE RUEHDBU #0348/01 0681128

ZNR UUUUU ZZH

R 091128Z MAR 07

FM AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 9771

INFO RUEHAK/AMEMBASSY ANKARA 1961

RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 1940

RUEHRL/AMEMBASSY BERLIN 1868

RUEHBS/USEU BRUSSELS 1185

RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC

RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE

RHEFDIA/DIA WASHINGTON DC

RUEHIL/AMEMBASSY ISLAMABAD 2041

RUEHBUL/AMEMBASSY KABUL 2002

RUEHNE/AMEMBASSY NEW DELHI 2017

RHEHAAA/NSC WASHINGTON DC

RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHINGTON DC

RUEHVEN/USMISSION USOSCE 1921

RUCPDOC/USDOC WASHDC 0145

RUEHDBU/AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE 1395

----------------- header ends ----------------

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 DUSHANBE 000348

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

STATE FOR SCA/CEN

E.O. 12958: N/A

TAGS: SMIG, ELAB, ECON, PINR, TI, RS

SUBJECT: TAJIK GOVT REACTION TO RUSSIAN MIGRATION LAW (C-RE7-00278)

REF: STATE 022077

DUSHANBE 00000348  001.2 OF 002

1.  (U) In a meeting with PolOff March 1, head of the State

Social Protection, Employment and Migration Agency Anvar Boboev

appeared optimistic that Russia's new migration law would make

it easier for Tajik labor migrants to travel to, register, and

obtain work permits in Russia.  Prior to the government

reorganization in December, Boboev headed the State Migration

Service, which was then subsumed into the larger agency and

folded into the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection.

Despite the expanded portfolio, migration issues continue to

occupy most of Boboev's time.

2.  (U) Publicly, the government has not expressed concern with

Russia's new law, stating that it will make it easier for Tajik

labor migrants to easily register and work in Russia.

Tajikistan has a visa-free regime with Russia.  According to

Boboev, the new law means that a Tajik migrant can enter Russia,

show an employer his migration card, international passport and

a receipt showing that he has paid his labor migration fee and

be considered a legal migrant.  Critics say that although

migrants can register legally, employers may still tend to hire

illegal migrants in order to avoid paying social benefit taxes

to the government.

3.  (U) Russia set Tajikistan's migrant quota at 600,000, far

below the one million currently believed to be working in

Russia.  Although the Tajik government publicly acknowledges

that between 500,000-600,000 Tajiks are in Russia working as

labor migrants, the government has petitioned Russia to increase

the quota to 800,000.  Boboev explained that the government

requested the 200,000 increase to accommodate the seasonal

migrants who travel frequently between the countries and for a

future overall population increase.  He did not know if Russia

would approve the increase, but was optimistic, citing

Tajikistan's close relationship with Russia.  Tajikistan relies

heavily on the over $1 billion in remittances from workers in

Russia.  The earnings prop up Tajikistan's local consumption

boom.

4.  (U) The bulk of Tajik labor migrants - approximately 46

percent - work as low-skill laborers in construction; 20 percent

work in Russia's markets; while the remainder work in health,

education, and other sectors.  Boboev pointed out that although

many Tajik migrants are skilled in technical trades such as auto

mechanics, many do not have certificates validating their

skills.  The Tajik government plans to establish training

centers to teach short-term courses and certify technical skills

for migrants.  These certificates will be valid in Russia as

well.

5.  (U) Boboev cited that Russia deported 17,000 Tajik migrants

in 2005, but only 6,100 in 2006.  He attributes the drastic

decrease to increased migrant awareness and education.  Boboev

predicts that Russia will deport even fewer migrants this year.

6.  (U) Although publicly the Tajik government has not expressed

concern about Russia's new immigration law, the government is

bracing itself for an influx of migrants returning from Russia.

According to Boboev, the government aims to create more job

opportunities in Tajikistan by improving economic conditions for

small and medium-sized enterprises, with a particular emphasis

on developing job opportunities for women.  Boboev did not

explain what steps the government would take to make this

happen.  Returnees face bleak job prospects in a 20 percent

unemployment market, and many local citizens fear an uptick in

crime.

7.  (U) It is still too early to gauge the law's impact, and the

general population's response has been muted.  Local

non-governmental organizations that serve as migrant information

centers agree with the government's prognosis that the law will

be a positive development and will encourage more migrants to

register legally.  The centers are ready to educate migrants on

the new law and their rights.

8.  (U) COMMENT:  Although the new law may encourage Tajik labor

migrants to register legally, it does not address the migration

DUSHANBE 00000348  002.2 OF 002

problems most Tajiks are concerned about.  Tajiks suffer

horrible living and working conditions in Russian and cases of

extreme and violent racism are not rare.  Every year, more than

a few migrants return to Tajikistan in body bags.  Corrupt

ticket consolidators charge migrants triple for Tajik Air

tickets to and from Russia.  However, at least they have jobs in

Russia.  If Russia closes its doors, Tajiks will likely pursue

openings in other countries.  END COMMENT.

JACOBSON

=======================CABLE ENDS============================

id: 100027

date: 3/12/2007 15:35

refid: 07DUSHANBE351

origin: Embassy Dushanbe

classification: UNCLASSIFIED

destination:

header:

VZCZCXRO2767

OO RUEHDBU

DE RUEHDBU #0351/01 0711535

ZNR UUUUU ZZH

O R 121535Z MAR 07

FM AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 9777

INFO RUEHDBU/AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE 1401

----------------- header ends ----------------

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 03 DUSHANBE 000351

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A

TAGS: PHUM, PREL, SNAR, TI

SUBJECT: DUSHANBE LEAHY VETTING REQUEST:  DCA, MINISTRY OF INTERIOR

AND US EMBASSY PERSONNEL

1. This is an action cable.  See paragraph 4.

2. Post has been asked to conduct a human rights review for the

following personnel from the Drug Control Agency Under the

President of the Republic of Tajikistan and Tajik Ministry of

Interior appointed to attend drivers training courses organized

by the Department of Justice and funded by INL.  U.S. Embassy

national staff are also included.

A.  LAST NAME:  Butaev

FIRST NAME:  Shuhrat

DOB:  12.09.1971

POB:  Tajikistan

RANK:  Junior Lieutenant

POSITION: Inspector of the 3d Mobile detachment

AGENCY:  Drug Control Agency

B.  LAST NAME:  Zayniddinov

FIRST NAME: Kamoliddin

DOB:  01.07.1969

POB:  Tajikistan

RANK:  Sergeant Major

POSITION: Driver of the financial management department

AGENCY:  Drug Control Agency

C.  LAST NAME:  Khuseinov

FIRST NAME:  Anvar

DOB:  04.06.1969

POB:  Tajikistan

RANK:  Sergeant Major

POSITION: Driver of the financial management department

AGENCY:  Drug Control Agency

D.  LAST NAME:  Boltaev

FIRST NAME:  Alisher

DOB:  05.08.1964

POB:  Tajikistan

RANK:  Sergeant Major

POSITION:  Driver of the financial management department

AGENCY:  Drug Control Agency

E.  LAST NAME:  Ochilov

FIRST NAME:  Nazri

DOB:  31.05.1963

POB:  Tajikistan

RANK:  Sergeant Major

POSITION: Driver of the financial management department

AGENCY:  Drug Control Agency

F.  LAST NAME:  Jinaev

FIRST NAME:  Saivali

DOB:  22.04.1978

POB:  Tajikistan

RANK:  Sergeant Major

POSITION: Driver of the financial management department

AGENCY:  Drug Control Agency

G.  LAST NAME: Ashurov

FIRST NAME:  Kamoliddin

DOB:  16.10.1972

POB: Pendjikent

RANK:  Ensign Lieutenant

POSITION: engineer, senior inspector on road trafficking

AGENCY:  Ministry of Interior

H.  LAST NAME: Davlatov

FIRST NAME:  Adbulahat

DOB: 07.04.1966

POB:  Rudaki District

RANK:  Ensign Lieutenant

POSITION: MoI motorpool driver

AGENCY:  Ministry of Interior

I.  LAST NAME:  Salohov

FIRST NAME: Ayniddin

DOB:  09.04.1965

POB:  Dushanbe

RANK:  Ensign Lieutenant

POSITION: MoI motorpool driver

AGENCY:  Ministry of Interior

J.  LAST NAME:  Kholov

FIRST NAME:  Toir

DOB:  04.11. 1963

POB:  Lenin District

RANK:  Sergeant Major

POSITION: MoI motorpool driver

AGENCY:  Ministry of Interior

K.  LAST NAME:  Sanoev

FIRST NAME: Dilshod

DOB:  26.01.1963

POB:  Dushanbe

DUSHANBE 00000351  002 OF 003

RANK:  Sergeant Major

POSITION: MoI motorpool driver

AGENCY:  Ministry of Interior

L.  LAST NAME:  Gulov

FIRST NAME:  Rajab

DOB:  20.12.1962

POB:  Dushanbe

RANK:  Sergeant

POSITION: MoI motorpool driver

AGENCY:  Ministry of Interior

M.  LAST NAME: Safarova

FIRST NAME:  Nigora

DOB:  18.02.1982

POB:  Dushanbe

POSITION: SLEA Program Management Assistant

AGENCY:  US Embassy

N.  LAST NAME:  Ganieva

FIRST NAME:  Dilorom

DOB:  21.03.1976

POB: Dushanbe

POSITION: EXBS Program Assistant

AGENCY:  US Embassy

O.  LAST NAME:  Nozilov

FIRST NAME:  Suhrob

DOB:  30.09.1975

POB:  Hissar

POSITION: Real Estate/Procurement Assistant

AGENCY:  US Embassy

P.  LAST NAME:  Saidov

FIRST NAME:  Bozor

DOB:  02.09.1956

POB:  Tajikistan

POSITION: AID Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

Q.  LAST NAME:  Rahmatov

FIRST NAME:  Anvar

DOB:  28.03.1949

POB:  Tajikistan

POSITION: AID Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

R.  LAST NAME:  Zaripov

FIRST NAME:  Rustam

DOB:  23.08.1955

POB:   Tajikistan

POSITION: AID Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

S.  LAST NAME:  Akramov

FIRST NAME:  Khurshed

DOB:  13.02.1978

POB:  Pendjikent

POSITION:  GSO + Pol/Mil Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

T.  LAST NAME:  Nabiev

FIRST NAME:  Mamatkul

DOB:  20.03.1960

POB:  Leninskiy District

POSITION: COM Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

U.  LAST NAME:  Mirov

FIRST NAME:  Anvar

DOB:  25.07.1963

POB:  Dushanbe

POSITION: GSO + COM Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

V.  LAST NAME: Nazarov

FIRST NAME:  Amirshho

DOB:  25.05.68

POB:  Vanj

POSITION: COM Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

W.  LAST NAME:  Alimov

FIRST NAME:  Shokir

DOB:  04.06.1963

POB:  Dushanbe

POSITION: GSO Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

X.  LAST NAME:  Bobojonov

FIRST NAME:  Nabijon

DOB:  08.02.1972

POB:  Dushanbe

DUSHANBE 00000351  003 OF 003

POSITION: GSO Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

Y.  LAST NAME: Sharipov

FIRST NAME:  Bakhtiyor

DOB:  29.11.1968

POB:  Dushanbe

POSITION: GSO Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

Z.  LAST NAME:  Yasaviev

FIRST NAME:  Saidamir

DOB:  15.04.1972

POB:  Dushanbe

POSITION: GSO Driver

AGENCY:  US Embassy

3. Post has no credible information of gross violations of human

rights by any of the listed participants.

4. Action requested:  Post requests that Department check the

names against its databases and inform Post if no derogatory

information was found.  Unfortunately, the GOT provided the

above names to Post today and the course is set to begin on

March 15.  Department is kindly requested to expedite processing

of this human rights review.  Point of contact at Post is INL

Officer Ranjeet Singh at singhrk@state.gov.

JACOBSON

=======================CABLE ENDS============================

id: 100131

date: 3/13/2007 11:17

refid: 07DUSHANBE355

origin: Embassy Dushanbe

classification: UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

destination: 07DUSHANBE355

header:

VZCZCXRO3585

RR RUEHLN RUEHVK RUEHYG

DE RUEHDBU #0355/01 0721117

ZNR UUUUU ZZH

R 131117Z MAR 07

FM AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 9783

INFO RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE

RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC

RHEFDIA/DIA WASHINGTON DC

RHEHAAA/NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL WASHINGTON DC

RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 1404

RUEHVEN/USMISSION USOSCE 1923

RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 1942

RUEHIL/AMEMBASSY ISLAMABAD 2043

RUEHBUL/AMEMBASSY KABUL 2010

RUEHNE/AMEMBASSY NEW DELHI 2019

RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC

RUEHBS/USEU BRUSSELS 1187

RUEHDBU/AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE 1411

----------------- header ends ----------------

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 DUSHANBE 000355

SIPDIS

SENSITIVE

SIPDIS

STATE FOR SCA/CEN, DRL

E.O. 12958: N/A

TAGS: PGOV, PHUM, KDEM, TI

SUBJECT: TAJIKISTAN'S INDEPENDENT MEDIA PROCEEDS WITH CAUTION AFTER

ELECTION

DUSHANBE 00000355  001.2 OF 002

1.  (U)  SUMMARY:  Tajikistan's independent media is breathing

slightly easier after the presidential election.  In a lunch

hosted by EmbOffs March 1, eight independent journalists opened

up about the media environment.  Most admitted that although the

government has relaxed pressure on independent media, they are

wary of the new-found freedom and the government continues to

harass some journalists.  END SUMMARY:

2. (U)  Independent journalists told EmbOffs that after the

November 2006 presidential election, they have encountered less

government pressure and have continued to push the boundaries by

publishing articles critical of the government and government

officials.  The government now permits Mukhtor Boqizoda, an

independent newspaper editor, to publish his paper Nerui Sukhan.

 Boqizoda was found guilty of stealing electricity in 2005 and

given the unusual sentence of correctional labor, rather than a

fine, as is customary for such "administrative" violations.

Observers in the independent press feel the charge was a ruse to

force Boqizoda to cease printing his paper.

RADIO FREE EUROPE, NOT FREE TO OPERATE

3.  (SBU)  Despite some media freedom concessions, the

government still closely monitors the media.  One example of

ongoing government pressure surrounds the controversial new

urban plan.  In December 2006, Radio Free Europe/ Radio Liberty

broadcast a story about Dushanbe's new urban plan which

threatens to displace residents from the city center with

minimal compensation.  According to Embassy sources one of Radio

Free Europe/Radio Liberty's sources of information alleged

corrupt parties are behind the urban planning.  After the

report, the mayor's office sent Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

a letter stating that the story was one-sided and portrayed the

city government in a negative light.  It demanded Radio Free

Europe/Radio Liberty issue a public apology.  Radio Free

Europe/Radio Liberty's source has since, in a written statement,

denied ever making the comments to the correspondent.  Some

believe the mayor's office pressured the source into signing the

statement.  To date, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty has not

issued a public apology and the government has not pursued legal

action.

4.  (SBU)  Incidents such as the recent pressure on Radio Free

Europe/Radio Liberty remind journalists that the government is

watchful of their reporting.  Journalists continue to exercise

self-censorship.  One journalist said that despite an overall

improvement in government attitude, he would not bother to

publish his once shut-down paper and risk the government's

wrath.

NO DAILY PAPERS ON THE CORNER

5.  (U)  Access to news remains a problem in Tajikistan.  The

majority of towns and villages outside of the capital, receive a

limited number of hours of electricity every day meaning that

television and internet are rendered inaccessible most of the

time.  Tajikistan does not have a daily newspaper and without

regular television or internet access, most have to rely on

once-a-week newspapers published every Thursday.  When asked why

Tajikistan does not have a daily newspaper, the journalists

offered many excuses for the absence of a daily newspaper,

citing a lack of proper distribution channels as the main

culprit.  According to the journalists, it is very difficult to

distribute newspapers to Tajikistan's more rural areas.  Even

within Dushanbe, there is no reliable distributor and often the

companies pay children or old women to sell newspapers on a

street corner.  In the past, the government has shut down some

corner news kiosks citing the possibility of terrorists using

them to place bombs.  In Kulyab, a district in southern

Tajikistan of approximately 80,000 people, a single vendor sells

300 issues of papers brought from Dushanbe every week on a table

in the main center.  The independent journalists also point out

that the existing publishing houses are under strict government

control and would not be willing to print more than once a week.

 Some journalists argue that publishing a daily newspaper in

Tajikistan is not financially sustainable.

DUSHANBE 00000355  002.2 OF 002

6.  (SBU)  The journalists expressed skepticism about a daily

newspaper and some were not in favor of a daily newspaper

proposed by Asia-Plus, one of the leading news agencies in

Tajikistan.  The journalists feared that Asia-Plus would then

have a monopoly over news distribution and crush smaller

independent newspapers such as theirs.

7.  (U)  COMMENT:  The journalists' concerns about a powerful

daily newspaper overshadowing smaller papers reflect both an

underdeveloped professional ethic and lack of entrepreneurial

spirit in Tajikistan.  Donor organizations can support both

large news agencies and smaller independent papers to foster a

more diverse media.  A strong daily newspaper, particularly one

published in Tajik language, with a reliable and far-reaching

distributor and appropriately positioned vendors, would increase

access to information and open the door for future daily

newspapers.  END COMMENT.

JACOBSON

=======================CABLE ENDS============================

id: 100215

date: 3/13/2007 16:17

refid: 07DUSHANBE359

origin: Embassy Dushanbe

classification: UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

destination: 07DUSHANBE262

head

Источник: ИА "Авеста"
0.0
- всего оценок (0)
- ваша оценка


Новый комментарий
Автор Сообщение
Данную новость еще не обсуждали

Обсуждение в Facebook:




Главные новости

04.1215:34Узбекистан выбрал нового президента
04.1215:01День рождения Пророка: без помпезности и угощений
04.1212:14Жизнь в гараже. ВИДЕО
03.1216:40Душанбинских пекарей отправили в вынужденный отпуск
03.1215:16Ансори: Смертный приговор Бобака Занджани не отменен


Самое обсуждаемое

01.1214:11Атамбаев о ЕАЭС: вступаем в братский союз и встречаем старшего брата, который нам ножки подставляет(7)
02.1210:57Лидер Компартии Таджикистана верит председателю Нацбанка, но стоит в очереди за своим депозитом(3)
01.1209:43На реализацию новой Национальной стратегии развития Таджикистана необходимы $118,1 млрд.(3)
03.1210:32Когда у НПЗ "финансы поют романсы"...(1)
03.1209:12Эмомали Рахмону построят новые резиденции(1)



(C) 2001-2016 TopTJ.com

TopTJ.com - Новости Таджикистана
00:00:00.0240231